Collins Columns, Feb. 12, 2000
Douglas Collins

The Hate Industry has lost one. You might not think so from reading the mainstream media, but it is so.

After wasting two years of public money on peering into whether Bernard Klatt of Oliver had been spreading “hatred” as an Internet server, the guardians of our political morality have decided they had nothing on him.

“We consulted with the experts in the industry, both public and private, to ensure we had exhausted every possible avenue,” said the appropriately named Corporal Grant Learned of the RCMP in announcing that the cops and Klatt’s Jewish accusers had scored no goals.

Sol Littman of the “Nazi-hunting” Simon Wiesenthal Centre was the one who started this caper. In 1998 he captured the hearts and minds of the media by claiming that Oliver was “the hate capital of Canada”.

Littman has made many other excursions into falsehood. In 1984 he claimed that Dr. Josef Mengele, he of of Auschwitz, had applied to come to Canada as a landed immigrant and might have arrived.

That piece of fiction led to the Deschene Commission on war criminals that cost millions, plus a useless and even more costly hunt for them. But a government that can waste a billion bucks in handing out grants to friends and phonies would never worry about such small stuff. It is more interested in pleasing the pressure group paradiddlers.

Threatened with a lawsuit, Littman withdrew his statement while claiming in a kind of conjuring trick that he had never said it. The guy makes more claims than were made during the Klondike gold rush.

Hot on the hate trail, the media went into a feeding frenzy when it was known that Klatt was organizing a “hands off the Internet” meeting in Oliver community hall. Paul Fromm of the Canadian Association for Free Expression and I agreed to speak in defense of Klatt’s rights. I had never seen any of the material Littman was bitching about but I recognize a censor when I see one.

“Oliver awaits the hate,” was the Vancouver Sun’s headline. Much the same garbage was carried in the public prints in Oliver and the rest of the Okanagan. Mayor Linda Larson and her council got the shakes and canceled Klatt’s meeting room.

Whereupon we extremists decided that the event would be held on the city hall steps.

More press fever. “Racists challenge the decent people of Oliver,” was the fatuous editorial headline in the Sun. “B.C. town gives the boot to far right,” gloated the Globe.

The cops were there in force. So were the commies and their liberal accomplices. Meanwhile, members of the wayward media almost outnumbered our modest gathering — modest because a lot of people who intended to come either thought the meeting had been canceled or were scared off.

I spoke for 25 minutes, giving a review of the attacks on free speech in this happy land of ours. Paul Fromm spoke on the same theme.  Dangerous stuff!

Predictably, not a word of what we had to say in our speeches was reported, and if any public person had anything to say in favor of free expression it must have been lost in cyberspace.

In these enlightened times, you see, “free speech” equals hate speech. That’s why the term always appears in inverted commas.

As was to be expected, the CBC was tops in slanting the story.

Half way through my dull but detailed peroration a demented woman started screaming something about blacks and other victims of our vicious society. I had to stop talking for a few minutes while she hyperventilated. And when the Oliver story was run on CBC Newsworld, she was featured prominently, with reporter Terry Milewski turning to the camera and saying:

“She’s talking about Doug Collins, who says the Holocaust was Jewish propaganda.”

I had not even mentioned the Holocaust. And in fact I have never said any such thing. What I had said, in my 1994 column, which has been the subject of two human wrongs tribunals, was that the never-ending stream of Hollywood movies on the Holocaust was propaganda. Which is a different matter.

I complained to the CBC Ombudsman about that piece of gross reporting and six months later he found in my favor. “Your complaint is justified,” he declared. As well he might.

Why did it take him so long? Because CBC News and its pressure group accomplices had put under a microscope everything I had said or written since the mid-1980s without coming up with such a quote.

Attorney General Ujjal Dosanjh — my friend — chose to get in on the act.  On the same day that the Oliver meeting took place he organized a demonstration in Surrey, attended by a couple of hundred of his fellow East Indians, plus a number of white dupes.

“Give us stronger hate laws,” was Democrat Dosanjh’s theme. “Bring them into the 21st Century.”

As I say, another hate balloon has gone pop. Not that you would know it from the Vancouver Sun, the Globe & Mail, or CBC TV news. Unless it was
hidden in the truss ads, that is.

Doug.
================
Also see:  http://www.geocities.com/ftcnet/CBCRadio000209.html
doc_index